Wednesday, August 20, 2014

The 10 Biggest Surprises of My Polyvore Internship

Hi, my name is Julia Alvarez and I am a junior at Brown University, pursuing a degree in computer science. You should know that I am not one of those programmers who has been coding since I was in diapers. In fact, I switched from psychology to international relations to English and finally to computer science.

I "discovered" computer science after stepping into the opening day skit of Brown’s legendary CS15, an "Introduction to Object-Oriented Programing" course, and was hooked. I found that the beauty of CS was that I could actually make something useful, all while sitting at my desk. I wanted to learn more and to practice this magical "making" process, so I started hunting down a summer internship.

I had a mentor who did not work at a tech company, but knew many people who did. When she told me she knew some people who worked at Polyvore, I got really excited, because I had not only used Polyvore before, but I really liked it, and really believed (and still do) they had huge potential for growth. When they called me and told me they would like to interview me, I of course freaked out and said yes right away.

It has been ten weeks since I began my internship, and I would like to share the 10 most surprising things I have learned during my time here.

Friday, August 8, 2014

Diversity and Meritocracy at Polyvore

Nine months ago, a female engineer named Tracy Chou posed the question: Where are the numbers? Since then, over 170 companies have released their diversity numbers. Today we’re releasing Polyvore’s.



Many companies focus on increasing diversity at the front of the hiring pipeline. I think it’s equally important to think about what happens *after* people join a company. I believe one of the best ways to cultivate diversity in tech is to cultivate meritocracy. Simply put, people should be rewarded based on the merit of their work, regardless of their gender, race, age or tenure. This is fairer for everyone, period.

To achieve meritocracy at Polyvore, we try to be thoughtful about our processes and cultural norms. We use objective measures of success, like clear team goals and metrics. We use Scrum retrospectives and departmental email updates to ensure transparency around what’s being worked on, by who, and why it matters. We encourage a culture of explaining and asking why, to ensure that decisions are made based on the merit of people’s arguments, not on seniority or social clout. As CEO, I take the time to explain how we arrived at our strategy, versus just telling people to march in a particular direction. Although we have many fun social events (offsites at the beach, scotch o’ clock, doffle tastings), we ensure that important work decisions happen at work during work hours, not at events where some people might be absent. This prevents the formation of an “inner circle” (often a “boy’s club” at other companies) that excludes people from important decision-making.

No company is perfect. We’re certainly not as ethnically diverse as we could be. But as a female Computer Science grad whose 2005 department t-shirt was a drawing of 6 male stick figures and 1 female stick figure (a joke about the gender ratio), I’m proud that Polyvore’s engineering team is 26% female, well above the industry standard of 10-15%. I’m looking forward to seeing even more female engineers join us!

Most of all, I’m proud that our engineers work together every day on solving interesting technical problems, from crawler automation to image masking to mobile growth hacking, with the shared goal of being great engineers, regardless of gender, race, age or tenure.

To learn more, check out our team in action and find out about their hidden superpowers...



(And if you’re interested in joining us, check out our Jobs page! ;-)